Nearsightedness explained

August 22, 2016 — by William Goldstein
Tags: Nearsightedness Myopia Lasik Surgery

 

What is myopia?

Myopia, or nearsightedness, is a refractive error in the eye, which makes it unable for people to 
clearly see objects that are slightly at a distance. People who are nearsighted won’t have 
problems doing close-up tasks like using the computer or reading, but they could find it hard to 
read road signs.

What are the symptoms of myopia?

Myopia can cause symptoms such as eyestrain, squinting, headaches, or fatigue while 
performing activities like playing sports, driving, or looking at objects more than a few feet 
away.  The main symptom, however, is blurry vision when looking off in the distance

What causes myopia?

Since myopia is a refractive error, it structure of the eye, and is caused by abnormalities in its shape and size. The eyeball in nearsighted 
people is too long or the cornea can have very high, steep curvature. This causes the light entering the 
eye to become unfocused. Images are focused in front of the retina, which is the light-sensitive 
part of the eye, instead of being focused on the retina, and this results in blurred vision.
 
Typically, myopia can begin in childhood, and people have higher chances of developing this 
condition if their parents are nearsighted. In most cases, myopia stabilizes during early 
adulthood, but in some cases, it can continue to worsen with age.

How can you treat nearsightedness?

Myopia can be corrected with contact lenses or glasses. It can also be repaired using refractive 
surgery, such as LASIK surgery. Nearsighted people may need to wear their glasses or contact lenses during the entire 
day or only specific times during the day when they require clear distant vision depending on the 
degree of their condition. It is important that they wear their lenses or glasses while driving or 
performing other tasks which could lead to accidents in case of inattentiveness.